The length it takes from submission to publication

The other day I received a positive comment about my housing demolition paper. It made me laugh abit inside — it felt like I finished that work so long ago it was talking about history. That paper was not so ancient though, I submitted it 8/4/17, went through one round of revision, and I got the email from Jean McGloin for conditional acceptance on 1/16/18. It then came online first a few months later (3/15/18), and is in the current print issue of JRCD, which came out in May 2018.

This ignores the time it takes from conception to finishing a project (we started the project sometime in 2015), but focusing just on the publishing process this is close to the best case scenario for the life-cycle of a paper through peer reviewed journals in criminology & criminal justice. The realist best case scenario typically is:

  • Submission
  • Wait 3 months for peer reviews
  • Get chance to revise-resubmit
  • Wait another 3 months for second round of reviews and editor final decision

So ignoring the time it takes for editors to make decisions and the time for you to turn around edits, you should not bank on a paper being accepted under 6 months. There are exceptions to this, some journals/editors don’t bother with the second three month wait period for reviewers to look at your revisions (which I think is the correct way to do it), and sometimes you will get reviews back faster or slower than three months, but that realist scenario is the norm for most journals in the CJ/Crim field. Things that make this process much slower (multiple rounds of revisions, editors taking time to make decisions, time it takes to make extensive revisions), are much more common than things that can make it go shorter (I’ve only heard myths about a uniform accept on the first round without revisions).

Not having tenure this is something that is on my mind. It is a bit of a rat race trying to publish all the papers expected of you, and due to the length of peer review times you essentially need to have your articles out and under review well before your tenure deadline is up. The six month lag is the best case scenario in which your paper is accepted at the first journal you submit to. The top journals are uber competitive though, so you often have to go through that process multiple times due to rejections.

So to measure that time I took my papers, including those not published, to see what this life-cycle time is. If I only included those that were published it would bias the results to make the time look shorter. Here I measured the time it took from submission of the original article until when I received the email of the paper being accepted or conditionally accepted. So I don’t consider the lag time at the end with copy-editing and publishing online, nor do I consider up front time from conception of the project or writing the paper. Also I include three papers that I am not shopping around anymore, and censored them at the date of the last reject. For articles still under review I censored them at 5/9/18.

So first, for 25 of my papers that have received one editorial decision, here is a graph of the typical number of rejects I get for each paper. A 0 for a paper means it was published at the first journal I submitted to, a 1 means I had one reject and was accepted at the second journal I submitted the paper to, etc. (I use "I" but this includes papers I am co-author on as well.) The Y axis shows the total percentage, and the label for each bar shows the total N.

So the proportion of papers of mine that are accepted on the first round is 28%, and I have a mean of 1.6 rejections per article. This does not take into account censoring (not sure how to for this estimate), and that biases the estimate of rejects per paper downward here, as it includes some articles under review now that will surely be rejected at some point after writing this blog post.

The papers with multiple rejects run the typical gamut of why academic papers are sometimes hard to publish. Null results, a hostile reviewer at multiple places, controversial findings. It also illustrates that peer review is not necessarily a beacon showing the absolute truth of an article. I’m pretty sure everything I’ve published, even papers accepted at the first venue, have had one reviewer with negative comments. You could find reasons to reject the findings of anything I write that has been peer reviewed — same as you can think many of my pre-print articles are correct or useful even though they do not currently have a peer review stamp of approval.

Most of those rejections add about three months to the life-cycle, but some can be fast (these include desk rejections), and some can be slower (rejections on later rounds of revisions). So using those begin times, end times, and taking into account censoring, I can estimate the typical survival time of my papers within the peer-review system when lumping all of those different factors together into the total time. Here is the 1 - survival chart, so can be interpreted as the number of days until publication. This includes 26 papers (one more that has not had a first decision), so this estimate does account for papers that are censored.

The Kaplan-Meier estimate of the median survival times for my papers is 290 days. So if you want a 50% chance of your article being published, you should expect 10 months based on my experience. The data is too sparse to estimate extreme quantiles, but say I want an over 80% probability of an article being published based on this data, how much time do I need? The estimate based on this data is at least 460 days.

Different strategies will produce different outcomes — so my paper survival times may not generalize to yours, but I think that estimate will be pretty reasonable for most folks in Crim/CJ. I try to match papers to journals that I think are the best fit (so I don’t submit everything to Criminology or Justice Quarterly at the first go), so I have a decent percent of papers that land on the first round. If I submitted first round to more mediocre journals overall my survival times would be faster. But even many mid-tiered journals in our field have overall acceptance rates below 10%, nothing I submit I ever think is really a slam dunk sure thing, so I don’t think my overall strategy is the biggest factor. Some of that survival time is my fault and includes time editing the article in between rejects and revise-resubmits, but the vast majority of this is simply waiting on reviewers.

So the sobering truth for those of us without tenure is that based on my estimates you need to have your journal articles out of the door well over a year before you go up for review to really ensure that your work is published. I have a non-trivial chunk of my work (near 20%) that has taken over one and a half years to publish. Folks currently getting their PhD it is the same pressure really, since to land a tenure track job you need to have publications as well. (It is actually one I think reasonable argument to take a longer time writing your dissertation.) And that is just for the publishing part — that does not include actually writing the article or conducting the research. The nature of the system is very much delayed gratification in having your work finally published.

Here is a link to the data on survival times for my papers, as well as the SPSS code to reproduce the analysis.

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Roadblocks in Buffalo update (plus more complaints about peer-review!)

I’ve updated the roadblocks in Buffalo manuscript due to a rejection and subsequent critiques. So be prepared about my complaints of the peer-review!

I’ve posted the original manuscript, reviews and a line-by-line response here. This was reviewed at Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management. I should probably always do this, but I felt compelled to post this review by the comically negative reviewer 1 (worthy of an article on The Allium).

The comment of reviewer 1 that really prompted me to even bother writing a response was the critique of the maps. I spend alot of time on making my figures nice and understandable. I’m all ears if you think they can be improved, but best be prepared for my response if you critique something silly.

So here is the figure in question – spot anything wrong?

The reviewer stated it did not have legend, so it does not meet "GIS standards". The lack of a legend is intentional. When you open google maps do they have a legend? Nope! It is a positive thing to make a graphic simple enough that it does not need a legend. This particular map only has three elements: the outline of Buffalo, the streets, and the points where the roadblocks took place. There is no need to make a little box illustrating these three things – they are obvious. The title is sufficient to know what you are looking at.

Reviewer 2 was more even keeled. The only thing I would consider a large problem in their review was they did not think we matched comparable control areas. If true I agree it is a big deal, but I’m not quite sure why they thought this (sure balance wasn’t perfect, but it is pretty close across a dozen variables). I wouldn’t release the paper if I thought the control areas were not reasonable.

Besides arbitrary complaints about the literature review this is probably the most frustrating thing about peer-reviews. Often you will get a list of two dozens complaints, with most being minor and fixable in a sentence (if not entirely arbitrary), but the article will still be rejected. People have different internal thresholds for what is or is not publishable. I’m on the end that even with worts most of the work I review should still be published (or at least the authors given a chance to respond). Of the 10 papers I’ve reviewed, my record is 5 revise-and-resubmits, 4 conditional accepts, and 1 rejection. One of the revise-and-resubmits I gave a pretty large critique of (in that I didn’t think it was possible to improve the research design), but the other 4 would be easily changed to accept after addressing my concerns. So worst case scenario I’ve given the green light to 8/10 of the manuscripts I’ve reviewed.

Many reviewers are at the other end though. Sometimes comically so, in that given the critiques nothing would ever meet their standards. I might call it the golden-cow peer review standard.

Even though both of my manuscripts have been rejected from PSM, I do like their use of a rubric. This experience makes me wonder what if the reviewers did not give a final reject-accept decision – just the editors took the actual comments and made their own decision. Editors do a version of this currently, but some are known to reject if any of the reviewers give a rejection no matter what the reviewers actually say. It would force the editor to use more discretion if the reviewers themselves did not make the final judgement. It also forces reviewers to be more clear in their critiques. If they are superficial the editor will ignore them, whereas the final accept-reject is easy to take into account even if the review does not state any substantive critiques.

I don’t know if I can easily articulate what I think is a big deal and what isn’t though. I am a quant guy, so the two instances I rejected were for model identification in one and for sample selection biases in the other. So things that could not be changed essentially. I haven’t read a manuscript that was so poor I considered it to be unsalvagable in terms of writing. (I will do a content analysis of reviews I’ve recieved sometime, but almost all complaints about the literature review are arbitrary and shouldn’t be used as reasons for rejection.)

Often times I write abunch of notes on the paper manuscript my first read, and then when I go to write up the critique specifically I edit them out. This often catches silly initial comments of mine, as I better understand the manuscript. Examples of silly comments in the reviews of the roadblock paper are claiming I don’t conduct a pre-post analysis (reviewer 1), and asking for things already stated in the manuscript (reviewer 2 asking for how long the roadblocks were and whether they were "high visibility"). While it is always the case things could be explained more clearly, at some point the reviewer(s) needs to be more careful in their reading of the manuscript. I think my motto of "be specific" helps with this. Being generic helps to conceal silly critiques.

Posting my peer reviews on Publons and a few notes about reviewing

Publons is a service that currates your peer review work. In a perfect world this would be done by publishers – they just forward your reviews with some standard meta-data. This would be useful when one paper is reviewed multiple times, as well as identifying good vs. poor reviewers. I forget where I saw the suggestion recently (maybe on the orgtheory or scatterplot blog), but someone mentioned it would be nice if you submit your paper to a different journal to forward your previous reviews at your discretion. I wouldn’t mind that at all, as oft the best journals will reject for lesser reasons because they can be more selective. (Also I’ve gotten copy-paste same reviews from different journals, even though I have updated the draft to address some of the comments. Forwarding would allow me to address those comments directly before the revise-resubmit decision.)

I’ve posted all of my reviews so far, but they are only public if the paper is eventually accepted. So here you can see my review for the recent JQC article Shooting on the Street: Measuring the Spatial Influence of Physical Features on Gun Violence in a Bounded Street Network by Jie Xu and Elizabeth Griffiths.

I’ve done my fair share of complaining about reviews before, but I don’t think the whole peer-review process is fatally flawed despite its low reliability. People take peer review a bit too seriously at times – but that is a problem for most academics in general. Even if you think your idea is not getting a fair shake, just publish it yourself on your website (or places like SSRN and ArXiv). This of course does not count towards things like tenure – but valuing quantity over quality is another separate problem currently in academia.


In the spirit of do unto others as you would have them do unto you, here are a two main points I try to abide by when I review papers.

  • be as specific as possible in your critique

There is nothing more frustrating than getting a vague critique (the paper has multiple mispellings and grammar issues). A frequent one I have come across (both in reviews of my papers and seeing comments others have made on papers I’ve reviewed) is in the framing of the paper – a.k.a. the literature review. (Which makes sending the paper to multiple journals so frustrating, you will always get more arbitrary framing debates each time with new reviewers.)

So for a few examples:

  • (bad) The literature review is insufficient
  • (good) The literature review skips some important literature, see specifically (X, 2004; Y, 2006; Z, 2007). The description of (A, 2000) is awkward/wrong.
  • (bad) The paper is too long, it can be written in half the length
  • (better) The paper could be shortened, section A.1 can be eliminated in my opinion, and section A.2 can be reduced to one paragraph on X.

Being specific provides a clear path for the author to correct what you think, or at least respond if they disagree. The “you can cut the paper in half” I don’t even know how to respond to effectively, nor the generic complaint about spelling. One I’ve gotten before is “x is an innapropriate measure” with no other detail. This is tricky because I have to guess why you think it is innapropriate, so I have to make your argument for you (mind read) and then respond why I disagree (which obviously I do, or I wouldn’t have included that measure to begin with). So to respond to a critique I at first have to critique my own paper – maybe this reviewer is more brilliant than I thought.

Being specific I also think helps cut down on arbitrary complaints that are arguable.

  • provide clear signals to the editor, both about main critiques and the extent to which they can be addressed

Peer review has two potential motivations, one is a gate-keeper and one is to improve the draft. Often times arbitrary advice by reviewers intended for the latter is not clearly delineated in the review, so it is easily confused for evidence pertinent to the gate-keeper function. I’ve gotten reviews of 20 bullet points or 2,000 words that make it seem like a poor paper due to sheer length of the comment, but the majority are minor points or arbitrary suggestions. Longer reviews actually suggest the paper is better – if there is something clearly wrong you can say it in a much shorter space.

Gabriel Rossman states these different parts of peer review a bit more succintly than me:

You need to adopt a mentality of “is it good how the author did it” rather than “how could this paper be made better”

I think this is a good quip to follow. I might add “don’t sweat the small stuff” to that as well. Some editors will read the paper and reviews and make judgement calls – but some editors just follow the reviewers blindly – so I worry with the 20 bullet point minor review that it unduly influenced a reject decision. I’m happy to respond to the bullets, and happy you took the time, but I’m not happy about you (the reviewer) not giving clear advice to the editor of the extent to which I can address those points.

I still give advice about improving the manuscript, but I try to provide clear signals to the editor about main critiques, and I also will explicitly state whether they can be addressed. The “can be addressed” is not for the person writing the paper – it is for the editor making the decision for whether to revise-and-resubmit! The main critiques in my experience will either entail 2-3 main points (or none at all for some papers). I also typically say when things are minor and put them in a separate section, which editors can pretty much ignore.

Being a quantitative guy, the ones that frustrate me the most are complaints about model specifications. Some are legitimately major complaints, but often times it will be things that are highly unlikely to greatly influence the reported results. Examples are adding/dropping/changing a particular control variable and changes in the caliper used for propensity score matching. Note I’m not saying you shouldn’t ask to see differences, I’m asking that you clearly articulate why your suggestion is preferable and make an appropriate judgement as to whether it is a big problem or a little problem. A similar complaint is what information to include in tables or in the main manuscript or appendix. The author already has the information, so it is minor editing, not a major problem.


While I am here I will end with three additional complaints that don’t fit into anywhere previously in my post. One, multiple rounds of review are totally a waste. So the life cycle of the paper-review should be

paper -> review -> editor decision -> reject/accept
                                          or
                                      revise-resumbit -> new paper + responses to reviews -> editor decision

The way the current system works, I have to submit another review after the new paper has been submitted. I rather the editor take the time to see if the authors sufficiently addressed the original complaints, because as a reviewer I am not an unbiased judge of that. So if I say something is important and you retort it is not, what else do you want me to say in my second review! It is the editors job at that point to arbiter disagreements. This then stops the cycle of multiple rounds of review, which have a very large amount of diminishing returns in improving the draft.

This then leads into my second complaint, generally about keeping a civil tone for reviews. In general I don’t care if a reviewer is a bit gruff in the review – it is not personal. But since reviewers have a second go, when I respond I need to keep an uber deferential tone. I don’t think that is really necessary, and I’d rather original authors have similar latitude to be gruff in responses. Reviewers say stupid things all the time (myself included) and you should be allowed to retort that my critique is stupid! (Of course with reasoning as to why it is stupid…)

Finally, I had one reviewer start recently:

This paper is interesting and very well written…I will not focus on the paper’s merits, but instead restrict myself to areas where it can be improved.

The good is necessary to signal to the editor whether a paper should be published. I’ve started to try in my own reviews to include more of the good (which is definately not the norm) and argue why a paper should be published. You can see in my linked review of the Xu and Griffiths paper by the third round I simply gave arguments why the paper should be published, despite a disagreement about the change-point model they reported on in the paper.